The Broken Road

One of two books by the author set in British India. It is an exciting adventure story involving the Indian Army, Rajas and secret agents.


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The Drum

Murder and intrigue in a princely state on the Indian border. A fairy drum no one must see beaten. A secret mission across the Hindu Kush and friendship between an Indian Prince and an English drummer-boy.All these are elements of "The Drum" which is one of two novels by A.E.W. Mason set in India.A pukka adventure in the days of the Raj.

The Virgin of the Sun

The Inca Empire, gold, adventure and Love. In memory of those far-off days will you accept a tale that deals with one of them, that of the marvellous Incas of Peru; with the legend also that, long before the Spanish Conquerors entered on their mission of robbery and ruin, there in that undiscovered land lived and died a White God risen from the sea?



The Young Rajah

A trip from England to India where many dangers are faced by the story's hero. William Henry Giles Kingston (1814-1880), was a writer of tales for boys. He was born in London, but spent much of his youth in Oporto. His first book, The Circassian Chief, appeared in 1844. His first book for boys, Peter the Whaler, was published in 1851, and had such success that he retired from business and devoted himself entirely to the production of this kind of literature, in which his popularity was deservedly great; and during 30 years he wrote upwards of 130 tales, including Digby Heathcote (1860), The Three Midshipmen (1862), The Three Lieutenants (1874), The Three Commanders (1875) and In the Rocky Mountains (1878). He also conducted various papers, including The Colonist, and Colonial Magazine and East India Review. He was also interested in emigration, volunteering, and various philanthropic schemes. For services in negotiating a commercial treaty with Portugal he received a Portuguese knighthood, and for his literary labours a Government pension.


Queen Sheba's Ring

Every one has read the monograph, I believe that is the right word, of my dear friend, Professor Higgs-Ptolemy Higgs to give him his full name-descriptive of the tableland of Mur in North Central Africa, of the ancient underground city in the mountains which surrounded it, and of the strange tribe of Abyssinian Jews, or rather their mixed descendants, by whom it is, or was, inhabited. I say every one advisedly, for although the public which studies such works is usually select, that which will take an interest in them, if the character of a learned and pugnacious personage is concerned, is very wide indeed. Not to mince matters, I may as well explain what I mean at once. 



The Circassian Slave

The following story relates to that exceedingly interesting and romantic portion of the world bordering on the Black Sea, the Sea of Marmora, and the Bosphorus. The period of the story being quite modern, its scenes are a transcript of the present time in the city of the Sultan. The peculiarities of Turkish character are of the follower of Mahomet, as they appear to-day; and the incidents depicted are such as have precedents daily in the oriental capital. Leaving the tale to the kind consideration of the reader, the author would not fail to express his thanks for former indulgence and favor.



Nada the Lily

Nada the Lily is a romance set in southern Africa at the time of Chaka Zulu, one of Africa's most successful military leaders and yet also one of the most brutal and ruthless. It is a story of adventure, heroism, war and love.